[ FAQs ]

We have compiled a general list of frequently asked questions to aid you in navigating the COVID-19 crisis. We will continue to update this page with Investor Questions and more information on resources as they become available. Please do not hesitate to reach out to GLI directly if you cannot readily find the answer to your question. We are here to support you and your business and will work to find the answer to any question that you have in these uncertain times. Thank you to our content partners: ActionCoach Business Coaching Louisville, American Heart Association, Dean Dorton, Frost Brown Todd LLC, HR Affiliates, Humana, Integrity HR, Kentuckiana Works, Louisville Forward, Louisville Small Business Alliance (LIBA), Steptoe & Johnson, Stites & Harbison, Stoll Keenon Ogden, Strothman & Co, the University of Louisville.

Please choose a category:

[ Basics ]

There are a number of resources that are available to keep you informed:


Donations are being solicited to help the most in need in our community:

  • The One Louisville: COVID-19 Response Fund was created through a coalition of government and philanthropic organizations to deploy financial support to households working on the front lines of the Coronavirus outbreak.
  • If you would like to donate to the One Louisville: COVID-19 Response Fund, you can do so here.
  • A Small Business Continuity Loan Program was developed to help small businesses stay afloat until federal funding comes through. Donations of all sizes are welcome.

You can also support small businesses by:

  • Giving the Gift of Business: Buy a gift card that would cover your usual patronage over the coming weeks. (This can often be accomplished by phone or online.) Then spread out the use of those gift cards to support them as normal or give them away as gifts to people who haven't been to the business before.
  • Buying Now, Picking Up Later: If you had planned on purchasing a manufactured item like clothing or appliance, give the business a call. Pay for it now and have them set it aside for later pickup.
  • Keeping Your Membership: If you have a membership to a gym, special class, dance studio, exercise class, Chamber of Commerce, etc. keep it going. Many small businesses count on that constant support to keep their doors open. Your continued support might be what keeps their business alive.


  • The One Louisville: COVID-19 Response Fund was created through a coalition of government and philanthropic organizations to deploy financial support to households working on the front lines of the Coronavirus outbreak.
  • The goal of this Fund is to attract and provide financial assistance to help communities, households, and businesses who are disproportionately impacted by the virus and its economic consequences.
  • Grants will be directed weekly by the One Louisville Fund Committee, whose membership includes representatives of the philanthropic, nonprofit, corporate, and government sectors.
  • The Community Foundation of Louisville will administer grants to organizations working at the frontline of the COVID-19 outbreak in the Greater Louisville area as directed by the One Louisville Fund Committee.
  • If you would like to donate to the One Louisville: COVID-19 Response Fund, you can do so here.


It is incredibly important for us to support our hospitality industry. Although restaurants are closed to in-person dining, many of them are will offering carryout.

  • For a complete list of regional restaurants offering curbside takeout and delivery, click here. This curated list will be continuously updated on a daily if not hourly basis of available restaurant options. This database is a collaboration of Food and Dining Magazine and Louisville Tourism staff.
  • PARC is also allowing free 15-minute parking at meters adjacent to restaurants to accommodate people picking up carryout. Be sure to put your flashers on!


Many businesses are working to help support our community. If your business is modifying your normal operations during this crisis, please contact us and let us know.


[ Workplace & Health ]

  • The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) is offering Virtual Connection Support Groups for individuals with mental health conditions. Contact Jennifer Jarrett or call 502-648-1564 for more information.
  • The Fund for the Arts, in partnership with the Arts & Culture Alliance, has created a website to offer virtual arts experiences to be enjoyed from home.
  • Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) and the Frazier History Museum are collaborating on a new project called the Coronavirus Capsule. Students are being asked to express their thoughts on the COVID-19 pandemic (experiences, feelings, emotions) through writing, photos, video, art, music, etc., to create a shared experience for us all. You can email your submission here, with Coronavirus Capsule in the subject line.
  • Yew Dell Botanical Gardens is offering weekly virtual tutorials and garden tours.
  • Louisville Metro launches Lift Up Lou initiative designed to lift up our spirits during the fight against Coronavirus to find fun ways to stay active, connected, and healthy.
  • KET is launching a Learn At Home broadcast service beginning Monday, March 30th for students and teachers in response to the impact COVID-19 has had on schools. KET’s traditional lineup from 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. will be replaced with a special lineup of programming that is specific to at-home learning for Pre-K through third grade, fourth through eighth grades, and ninth through twelfth grades. You can see an updated weekly schedule here.
  • For adult learners, KET is also offering workforce development programs through April 30th. Adult learners can access FastForward, a GED prep course, as well as Workplace Essential Skills, an online study system aimed at preparing adults for jobs in high demand career fields like IT, construction, advanced manufacturing and logistics.
  • StageOne launched a virtual storytelling and theatre-based instruction program through Channel StageOne. Content will be provided at least three times each week at 10 a.m. for students of various age groups. Programming will include online Storytellers performances, props tutorials, and other activities for the entire community to connect and create.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently published Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19, outlining steps employers can take to help protect their workforce. OSHA has divided workplaces and work operations into four risk zones, according to the likelihood of employees’ occupational exposure during a pandemic. These risk zones are useful in determining appropriate work practices and precautions.

Very High Exposure Risk:

  • Healthcare employees performing aerosol-generating procedures on known or suspected pandemic patients.
  • Healthcare or laboratory personnel collecting or handling specimens from known or suspected pandemic patients.

High Exposure Risk:

  • Healthcare delivery and support staff exposed to known or suspected pandemic patients.
  • Medical transport of known or suspected pandemic patients in enclosed vehicles.
  • Performing autopsies on known or suspected pandemic patients.

Medium Exposure Risk:

  • Employees with high-frequency contact with the general population (such as schools, high population density work environments, and some high-volume retail).

Lower Exposure Risk (Caution):

  • Employees who have minimal occupational contact with the general public and other coworkers (such as office employees).

Our guidance focuses on medium to lower risk work environments and please contact us for additional support in Very High and High Exposure settings.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has provided interim guidance that may help prevent workplace exposures to acute respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19, in non-healthcare settings. The guidance also provides planning considerations if there are more widespread, community outbreaks of COVID-19.

According to CDC guidance, individuals who have had close contact with a person diagnosed with COVID-19 should self-quarantine. Employers can require an employee who has been exposed to the virus to stay at home.

The likelihood that increasing numbers of employees will be unable to work either because they are sick or must care for others means that companies should review their paid time off and sick leave policies now.

Policies that give employees confidence that they will not be penalized and can afford to take sick leave are an important tool in encouraging self-reporting and reducing potential exposure.

For additional guidance on information regarding the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act or the CARES Act, click here.


While many jobs (retail, manufacturing, health care) require people to be physically present, work, including meetings, that can be done remotely should be encouraged if coming to work or traveling risks exposure to the virus. The CDC is now recommending no gathering of over 50 people and to utilize telework wherever possible.

  • For those of us who are able to work remotely, here are some helpful tips to make your work-from-home arrangement more productive, healthy, & happy from Fast Company:
  1. Get dressed and stick to your morning routine
  2. Create a dedicated work space
  3. Set and maintain your normal hours
  4. Focus on your output
  5. Eat healthy lunches
  6. Schedule more check-ins with your team
  7. Limit distractions

Dangerous rumors and worker fears can spread as quickly as a virus.

  • It is imperative for companies to be able to reach all workers, including those not at the worksite, with regular, internally coordinated, factual updates about infection control, symptoms, and company policy regarding remote work and circumstances in which employees might be excluded from or allowed to return to the workplace.
  • These communications should come from or be vetted by the emergency response team, and they should be carefully coordinated to avoid inconsistent policies being communicated by different managers or functions.
  • Clearly this requires organizations to maintain current phone/text and email contact information for all employees and test organization-wide communication periodically.
  • If you don’t have a current, universal contact capability already, now is a good time to create this.

Companies should track the CDC Travel Health Notices and the State Department Travel Advisories to determine what business travel should be canceled or postponed.

Yes. All group meetings and conferences should be cancelled at least through April 30, 2020.


Repeatedly, creatively, and aggressively encourage employees and others to take the same steps they should be taking to avoid the seasonal flu. For the annual influenza, SARS, avian flu, swine flu, and now the COVID-19 coronavirus, the best way to prevent infection is to avoid exposure. The messages you should be giving to your employees are:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. Avoid close contact with others, especially those who are sick.
  • Refrain from shaking hands with others for the time being.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Perhaps the most important message you can give to employees: stay home when you are sick.

As an employer, you should be doing the following:

  • Ensure that employees have ample facilities to wash their hands, including tepid water and soap, and that third-party cleaning/custodial schedules are accelerated.
  • Maintain required social distancing recommendations.
  • Evaluate your remote work capacities and policies (see later section on Remote Work for more information). Teleconference or use other remote work tools in lieu of meeting in person if available.
  • Consider staggering employee starting and departing times, along with lunch and break periods, to minimize overcrowding in common areas such as elevators, break rooms, etc.
  • Have a single point of contact for employees for all concerns that arise relating to health and safety.
  • Follow updates from the CDC and the World Health Organization (WHO) regarding additional precautions.

You may reference OSHA’s Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for an Influenza Pandemic for additional information on preparing for an outbreak. Additional resources on pandemic preparedness can be found at Ready.gov.

SHRM offers a simple, easy to use poster that you can easily distribute or hang in your office.

[ Finance ]

There are many intricate details relating to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) that affect individuals and businesses.

Check out Zippia's calculator here which gives a state by state breakdown of approximate unemployment as well as other resources.

There are some pretty important tax provisions of the CARES Act


Yes. You can access a service desk that allows business owners to submit a request for loan support from this Task Force made up of financial experts. There is a standard service time of 1-2 business days to complete a bank application once all information is received from the requesting business. The link to submit a request is available to all business owners.

The current Coronavirus pandemic is causing unprecedented economic disruption in the United States. The plight of businesses small and large has been well documented. We can only anticipate that many, particularly smaller businesses without significant capital base, will either entirely fail or seek to reorganize in bankruptcy. Many of the smaller businesses will no doubt seek to re-organize under the new small business reorganization act (“SBRA“), a new reorganization option that became available only in February 2020. Learn more here.

[ Employee Support ]

There have been some significant changes to unemployment insurance as a result of COVID-19:

  • GLI has developed a Guide to Unemployment Insurance during the COVID-19 outbreak. 
  • Indiana unemployment insurance information is available through DWD Indiana.
  • If you want to file for unemployment insurance in Kentucky, you can do so here.
  • If you want to file for unemployment insurance in Indiana, you can do so here.

YMCAs and other licensed child care providers, Gov. Andy Beshear announced, will be allowed to open their doors to children age 12 and younger whose parents have verified employment in any of the following fields:

  • First responder (law enforcement, EMS, fire departments)
  • Corrections officers
  • DCBS workers
  • First responder (law enforcement, EMS, fire departments)
  • Health care



  • JCPS will open 43 sites for families to pick up breakfast and lunch while schools are closed. The district will operate 37 school sites and eight mobile sites from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday. Only one meal per child present will be allowed. You can access a list of open sites here.
  • Bridgehaven Mental Health Services has created a pantry of items including non-perishable items, quick meals, cleaning supplies, pet care items, diapers and wipes that clients may need during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Bullitt County Schools are providing meals for students in their district. Find more information here. 
  • Other food resources can be found here.


  • Charter is offering free Spectrum broadband and Wi-Fi access to households with K-12 and/or college students who do not already have a Spectrum broadband subscription at any service level up to 100 Mbps. To enroll call 1-844-488-8395. Installation fees will be waived for new student households.
  • Louisville Free Public Library’s digital resources.
  • Free streaming movies for kids, courtesy of Kanopy Kids.
  • Check out these free art resources from The Speed Art Museum.
  • The Fund for the Arts, in partnership with the Arts & Culture Alliance, has created a website to offer virtual arts experiences to be enjoyed from home.
  • Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) and the Frazier History Museum are collaborating on a new project called the Coronavirus Capsule. Students are being asked to express their thoughts on the COVID-19 pandemic (experiences, feelings, emotions) through writing, photos, video, art, music, etc., to create a shared experience for us all. You can email your submission here, with Coronavirus Capsule in the subject line.
  • Yew Dell Botanical Gardens is offering weekly virtual tutorials and garden tours.
  • Louisville Metro launches Lift Up Lou initiative designed to lift up our spirits during the fight against Coronavirus to find fun ways to stay active, connected, and healthy.
  • KET is launching a Learn At Home broadcast service beginning Monday, March 30th for students and teachers in response to the impact COVID-19 has had on schools. KET’s traditional lineup from 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. will be replaced with a special lineup of programming that is specific to at-home learning for Pre-K through third grade, fourth through eighth grades, and ninth through twelfth grades. You can see an updated weekly schedule here.
  • StageOne launched a virtual storytelling and theatre-based instruction program through Channel StageOne. Content will be provided at least three times each week at 10 a.m. for students of various age groups. Programming will include online Storytellers performances, props tutorials, and other activities for the entire community to connect and create.



The One Louisville: COVID-19 Response Fund was created through a coalition of government and philanthropic organizations to deploy financial support to households working on the front lines of the Coronavirus outbreak.

  • The goal of this Fund is to attract and provide financial assistance to help communities, households, and businesses who are disproportionately impacted by the virus and its economic consequences.
  • Grants will be directed weekly by the One Louisville Fund Committee, whose membership includes representatives of the philanthropic, nonprofit, corporate, and government sectors.
  • The Community Foundation of Louisville will administer grants to organizations working at the frontline of the COVID-19 outbreak in the Greater Louisville area as directed by the One Louisville Fund Committee.
  • If you would like to donate to the One Louisville: COVID-19 Response Fund, you can do so here.

Households that need help can also seek it at their local Neighborhood Place location. Eligibility requirements are:

  • Must be Jefferson County residents
  • Must have an income below 100% of the area medium income (Louisville's AMI is $76,000 for a four-person home.)
  • Must be able to prove identity
  • Must show documents that prove loss of income over the coronavirus


The hospitality industry has been among the hardest hit during the COVID-19 outbreak. Here are some resources:

The Brookings Institution has provided steps and resources for comprehensive insurance coverage.

[ Operations ]

Yes. You can access a service desk that allows business owners to submit a request for loan support from this Task Force made up of financial experts. There is a standard service time of 1-2 business days to complete a bank application once all information is received from the requesting business. The link to submit a request is available to all business owners.

Of course it is a best practice to update your website and social media pages with that information. However, you will also want to submit that information to Louisville Tourism.

[ Government ]

Please visit Louisville Metro’s What You Need to Know page for the latest updates and information.

[ Hiring Options ]

GLI, in partnership with KentuckianaWorks has launched an initiative to support displaced workers and provide employers with assistance as they navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. This two-pronged approach supports both workers and employers with a new job board highlighting current opportunities in the region, and an effort to connect HR professionals laying off workers with other HR professionals who are hiring, considering translatable skill sets, competencies and hiring requirements as we connect employers. Contact Jessie Schook if you are an employer looking for assistance.

[ Investor Questions ]

GLI encourages regional employers to continue to prioritize workplace safety and wellness to minimize the community spread of the disease. This means encouraging employees to stay home if they are sick, following CDC guidelines to prevent illness, being flexible with your leave policies, and ensuring that you communicate these changes to your employees.  The Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM) offers good health, wellness and leave benefits for employers. For employers that must continue in-person operations, the CDC offers guidelines and best practices for keeping employees safe during this crisis and the SBA also offers guidance for Coronavirus planning and response for small businesses.

If there's any possibility employers can keep employees "whole" with respect to their paycheck during this situation, we recommend it. Not every employer will have the financial ability to do this, and that will create hardships for employees living paycheck to paycheck. At this time, the details of federal relief packages are still being developed, and we expect those details to be released in the upcoming days. We expect the relief packages would come in the form of tax reduction for employers on a federal level, and increased state unemployment benefits. As of today (March 17) there's not been specific details released, so this would be our speculative guess of what may be coming. Amy Letke, Founder & CEO, Integrity HR

The Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act expands the FMLA to add qualifying reasons for leave related to the coronavirus and to provide partial paid leave for such leave. The Act applies to all employers with fewer than 500 employees. An employee is eligible for coronavirus-FMLA leave if the employee has been employed for at least 30 calendar days by the employer from which the employee is requesting the leave. With respect to the FMLA provisions, the bill allows subsequent regulations to exempt small businesses with fewer than 50 employees when it would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern. Jennifer Wheatley, President, HR Affiliates

The only change in service at the moment for Louisville Metro Public Works is that yard waste collection has been suspended (except by request) through April 15, 2020. There are not currently changes to recycling centers or waste pick up. You can stay up-to-date on all things Public Works by subscribing to our Works Week newsletter. Mary Ellen Wiederwohl, Chief, Louisville Forward

At the end of the day, the most important item is the welfare, well-being, and safety of all students. Companies that are flexible and allow for remote working opportunities during these times are the ones who can best take advantage of their talents. For those organizations that need the students on-site, they must practice social distancing and provide a safe working environment, which includes cleaning products, sanitizers, and best practices. We are starting to see a few companies shed their interns along with their regular employees; unfortunately there is no other alternative for some businesses. We understand those circumstances and will not penalize the students for lack of credit hours. Employers should not fear any bad-will from having to dismiss an intern – we are prepared to handle the issue and support the students. We know companies will want to partner with the university in the future – it is a two way street. We need each other and will work to provide creative solutions along the way. T. Vernon Foster, Executive Director of MBA & Graduate Programs, Career Management and PR/Marketing, University of Louisville

We’re not stopping internships because that is truly a relationship built between the employer and the student. I do not anticipate long term impacts to internships as a result of this virus. Students need the work experience and employers have discovered the value associated with investing in these students while they are in school – I suspect the opportunities will continue to exist. If I were a college student today I would be looking hard for internship opportunities. Such career develop is valuable and distinguishes one’s resume from the pack. Dr. Ty J. Handy, President, Jefferson Community and Technical College

At this time, Metro’s tax filing and payment deadline remains the same as previous years. We are aware of the nationwide effects of COVID-19 and will take those into consideration if entities are delayed in their payment. Daniel Frockt, Chief Financial Officer, Louisville Metro

This is a complicated question. Traditional employee furlough is a mandatory suspension from work without pay. However, while some employees may not maintain benefit eligibility during a furlough, some do, depending on how eligibility is addressed in their underlying plan documents. The Fair Labor Standard Act (FLSA) also requires employers to pay employees for any work done during a furlough period (payment requirements vary based on exempt/non-exempt status.) On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed the Federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which expanded family and medical leave and guaranteed paid sick leave for certain U.S. workers. This act applies to employers that employ fewer than 500 workers and has two requirements: first, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was amended to allow employees to take up to 12 weeks of job-protected leave, where the first 20 days may consist of unpaid leave, but on day 11 employees must be paid for each day of leave during the 12-week period, up to a maximum of $200 per day and $10,000 total; and, second, covered employers must provide sick time to their employees. Layoffs are more straightforward because they can be treated like most other employment terminations from a benefits perspective. There is a COBRA triggering event for health benefits (medical, dental, vision, health FSA, etc.) upon termination for those covered under the employer’s benefit plans.  Employers can choose but are not required to subsidize COBRA for terminated employees. Additionally, laid off employees may be entitled to unemployment benefits, potentially increasing the employer’s unemployment tax rate. Shannon Antle Hamilton & Rebecca A. Weis, Stites & Harbison, PLLC

The employer does not have an obligation to report confirmed cases with the CDC. Local health officials are mandatory reporters and will be following their prescribed protocol. We recommend communicating the following information to your employees:

We as a company are elevating our safety precautions. If you or anyone in your home is not feeling well, you MUST work from home or take the necessary time off if you are ill. In addition, we expect you to stay home for a minimum of two weeks after all symptoms have dissipated.

If you have reason to believe that you have been exposed to COVID-19, you will be required to self-report this to your manager. There will be no retaliation or employment decisions based upon your self-disclosure. However, we wish to be able to notify any colleagues, vendors, or clients with whom you have been in contact that they could have possibly been exposed. We will ask you to identify all individuals who worked in close proximity (three to six feet) with you in the previous 14 days to ensure we have a full list of those who should be notified and/or sent home. If this is necessary, it will be communicated such that your personal name and information are protected and will not be identified.

If you are in a client facing position that requires your onsite presence to complete service expectations, please evaluate each situation with your client to determine if CDC recommended social distancing practices are in place prior to your onsite visit. If you have an underlying condition that would make you at higher risk of COVID-19, please discuss with your manager so that alternate work arrangements can be made for you. You do not need to disclose what your underlying medical condition is – merely that you must further limit social interaction. Jennifer Wheatley, President, HR Affiliates