[ Vaccine Information ]

We know that your safety is of the utmost importance. In this time of need, GLI has resources to educate you about the vaccines to protect against COVID-19. Here is information as of 1.14.2021. We encourage you to contact your state and local governments for the most current information.

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[ Timeline for Distribution ]

Indiana’s COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation Plan CLICK HERE

Both federal and state governments play a roll in local vaccine distribution. The vaccination rollout will be done is phases and administered through tiered priority groups. Tier 1A – Eligible for vaccination thru end of January. Includes: Healthcare workers, medical first responders (paramedics/EMTs), and long-term care residents and staff.

·      Tier 1B – Likely to begin by February and go thru late Spring. Includes: nonmedical first responders (police, fire, critical utility workers), educators, corrections staff, and adults over the age of 70.

·      Tier 1C – Expected* in mid to late Summer/early Fall. Includes: Adults over age 18 who have medical conditions that increase their risk of severe COVID-19 infection. The list of conditions has not yet been distributed by the federal government.

·      Tier 2 – Expected* in Fall/Winter. Includes: all adults over age 18.


*The timing for these groups is still uncertain

[ Vaccine Distribution Locations ]

It is important that you review your county and state health department websites for up to date information on vaccine distribution schedules and locations. Currently, the Louisville Metro Public Health & Wellness is operating a vaccination site at Broadbent Arena (part of the Kentucky Exposition Center, conveniently located just off I-65 in Louisville). Vaccinations are offered by appointment only and appointments are currently limited to individuals in priority Tier 1A, as determined by federal and state guidelines.

What does the process look like?

Once you have an appointment and are approved to receive the vaccine, you should enter the Kentucky Exposition Center via Gate 4, from Crittenden Drive. You will not be charged for parking. Before you exit your car, trained staff will ensure that you have an appointment and that you do not have a fever. An additional questionnaire will  ensure that it is appropriate for you to receive a vaccine. After this is complete, you will pull forward to the nurse’s station where you receive your injection through the window of your vehicle.

The estimated time to complete this process is 15 minutes but may take longer during peak times. Following the vaccination, you will be directed into a specific parking area, where you will wait for fifteen (15) minutes [or thirty (30) for some special cases] before leaving the Kentucky Exposition Center. Staff will be circulating in the parking lot to check on you. If you feel ill or need assistance during this time, turn on your hazard lights to signal staff.

LMPHW is only providing the Moderna mRNA vaccine. 

[ Vaccine - Moderna ]

General information

Name: mRNA-1273

Manufacturer: ModernaTX, Inc.

Type of vaccine: mRNA

Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work and get a better understanding of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines.

Number of shots: 2 shots, one month (28 days) apart

How given: Shot in the muscle of the upper arm

Does not contain:

  • Eggs
  • Preservatives
  • Latex

For a full list of ingredients, see Moderna’s COVID-19 Vaccine Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers

Who should get vaccinated

Who should not get vaccinated

  • If you have had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) or an immediate allergic reaction—even if it was not severe—to any ingredient in an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, you should not get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.*
  • If you have had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) or an immediate allergic reaction—even if it was not severe—after getting the first dose of the vaccine, you should not get another dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.*
  • An immediate allergic reaction means a reaction within 4 hours of getting vaccinated, including symptoms such as hives, swelling, or wheezing (respiratory distress).
  • This includes allergic reactions to polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polysorbate. Polysorbate is not an ingredient in either mRNA COVID-19 vaccine but is closely related to PEG, which is in the vaccines. People who are allergic to PEG or polysorbate should not get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccines and allergic reactions.

*If you have had an immediate allergic reaction—even if the reaction was not severe—to a vaccine or injectable therapy for another disease, ask your doctor if you should get a COVID-19 vaccine. Your doctor will help you decide if it is safe for you to get vaccinated.

Side effects and safety information

Most common side effects

In the arm where you got the shot:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Redness

Throughout the rest of your body:

  • Chills
  • Tiredness
  • Headache

These side effects usually start within a day or two of getting the vaccine. They might feel like flu symptoms and might even affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Get tips on what to expect after getting vaccinated.

Summary of safety data

  • In clinical trials, reactogenicity symptoms (side effects that happen within 7 days of getting vaccinated) were common but were mostly mild to moderate.
  • Side effects (such as fever, chills, tiredness, and headache) throughout the body were more common after the second dose of the vaccine.
  • Most side effects were mild to moderate. However, a small number of people had severe side effects that affected their ability to do daily activities.
  • CDC will continue to provide updates as we learn more about the safety of the Moderna vaccine in real-world conditions. Learn more about vaccine safety monitoring after a vaccine is authorized or approved for use.

Learn more about safety and reactogenicity data from the clinical trials.

Information on how well the vaccine works

  • Based on evidence from clinical trials, the Moderna vaccine was 94.1% effective at preventing laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 illness in people who received two doses who had no evidence of being previously infected.
  • The vaccine appeared to have high effectiveness in clinical trials (efficacy) among people of diverse age, sex, race, and ethnicity categories and among persons with underlying medical conditions.
  • Although few people in the clinical trials were admitted to the hospital, this happened less often in the people who got the Moderna vaccine compared to people who got the saline placebo.
  • CDC will continue to provide updates as we learn more about how well the Moderna vaccine works in real-world conditions.

Demographic information from clinical trials

Clinical trials for the Moderna vaccine included people from the following racial and ethnic categories:

  • 79.4% White
  • 20% Hispanic/Latino
  • 9.7% African American
  • 4.7% Asian
  • <3% other races/ethnicities

Age and sex breakdown:

  • 52.6% male
  • 47.4% female
  • 25.3% 65 years and older

Most people who participated in the trials (82%) were considered to have an occupational risk of exposure, with 25.4% of them being healthcare workers.

Among people who participated in the clinical trials, 22.3% had at least one high-risk condition, which included lung disease, heart disease, obesity, diabetes, liver disease, or HIV infection. Four percent (4%) of participants had two or more high-risk conditions.

Information sources from the Center for Disease Control & Prevention.

[ Vaccine - Pfizer-BioNTech ]

Pfizer-BioNTech

General information

Name: BNT162b2

Manufacturer: Pfizer, Inc., and BioNTech

Type of vaccine: mRNA

Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work and get a better understanding of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines.

Number of shots: 2 shots, 21 days apart

How given: Shot in the muscle of the upper arm

Does not contain:

  • Eggs
  • Preservatives
  • Latex

For a full list of ingredients, see Pfizer’s COVID-19 Vaccine Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers

Who should get vaccinated

Who should not get vaccinated

  • If you have had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) or an immediate allergic reaction—even if it was not severe—to any ingredient in an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, you should not get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.*
  • If you have had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) or an immediate allergic reaction—even if it was not severe—after getting the first dose of the vaccine, you should not get another dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.*
  • An immediate allergic reaction means a reaction within 4 hours of getting vaccinated, including symptoms such as hives, swelling, or wheezing (respiratory distress).
  • This includes allergic reactions to polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polysorbate. Polysorbate is not an ingredient in either mRNA COVID-19 vaccine but is closely related to PEG, which is in the vaccines. People who are allergic to PEG or polysorbate should not get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccines and allergic reactions.

*If you have had an immediate allergic reaction—even if the reaction was not severe—to a vaccine or injectable therapy for another disease, ask your doctor if you should get a COVID-19 vaccine. Your doctor will help you decide if it is safe for you to get vaccinated.

Side effects and safety information

  • In the arm where you got the shot:Throughout the rest of your body:Most common side effectsPain
  • Swelling
  • Redness
  • Chills
  • Tiredness
  • Headache

These side effects usually start within a day or two of getting the vaccine. They might feel like flu symptoms and might even affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Get tips on what to expect after getting vaccinated.

Summary of safety data

  • In clinical trials, reactogenicity symptoms (side effects that happen within 7 days of getting vaccinated) were common but were mostly mild to moderate.
  • Side effects (such as fever, chills, tiredness, and headache) throughout the body were more common after the second dose of the vaccine.
  • Most side effects were mild to moderate. However, a small number of people had severe side effects—defined as side effects affecting a person’s ability to do daily activities.
  • Although few people in the clinical trials went to the hospital or died, data suggest that people who got the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine were less likely to have these more serious outcomes compared to people who got the saline placebo.
  • CDC will continue to provide updates as we learn more about the safety of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in real-world conditions. Learn more about vaccine safety monitoring after a vaccine is authorized or approved for use.

Learn more about safety and reactogenicity data from the clinical trials.

Information on how well the vaccine works

  • Based on evidence from clinical trials, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was 95% effective at preventing laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 illness in people without evidence of previous infection.
  • CDC will continue to provide updates as we learn more about how well the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine works in real-world conditions.

Demographic information from clinical trials

Phase 2 and 3 clinical trials for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine included people from the following racial and ethnic categories:

  • 81.9% White
  • 26.2% Hispanic/Latino
  • 9.8% African American
  • 4.4% Asian
  • <3% other races/ethnicities

Age and sex breakdown:

  • 50.6% male
  • 49.4% female
  • 21.4% 65 years and older​

The most frequent underlying medical conditions were obesity (35.1%), diabetes (8.4%), and pulmonary disease (7.8%).

Learn more about demographic information for people who participated in the trials

Information sourced from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

[ Local, State, and Federal Resources ]

Federal

Kentucky State Resources

Indiana State Resources

Louisville Metro Resources


[ Who should get the vaccine ]

We recommend you consult with your primary care physician if you have concerns about receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.

Yes. Allergies of serious concern include those to polyethylene glycol (also known as MiraLAX and commonly found as an additive ingredient in pharmaceutical or cosmetic products) or to previous injected vaccines, especially if the reaction was anaphylaxis – a severe allergic reaction that may include swelling of your lips, tongue, and/or throat and may involve difficulty breathing, low blood pressure, a fast heart rate, and loss of consciousness. If you have a history of such reactions, you will be observed for thirty (30) minutes after your vaccination to ensure no developments occur. If a reaction develops, emergency resources are in place to treat you. Anaphylactic reactions are very rare, and all cases to date have been treated successfully. 

Yes. Although studies in pregnant women are limited, all available data suggests that it is safe for pregnant women and for lactating women to receive. Experts in obstetrics and gynecology suggest that the vaccine should be available for pregnant women because of their risk of severe COVID-19 infection. If you receive the vaccine while pregnant, you will be observed for thirty (30) minutes to ensure you do not have a reaction.

Not yet. These vaccines have not yet been thoroughly tested in children for appropriate dosing and to ensure the correct reaction.

If you have received another vaccination of any kind (including flu) within the past 14 days, you cannot receive a vaccine during that time. This is a CDC regulation.

It is important that you talk to your doctor for specific questions related to your care or current medication.